Category Archives: fiction reviews

Labyrinth by Eric Mackenzie-Lamb (1980)

IN THE DEPTHS OF THE SWAMP LURKED A GRUESOME NIGHTMARE Nope. Not really, anyway. Labyrinth is difficult, because I liked it quite a bit, but it also lied to me. It promised me a gruesome lurking nightmare, something ‘even more … Continue reading

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HALLOWEEN by Curtis Richards (1979)

I love movie novelisations, though they don’t always make it easy for me to do so. Lumpen prose and slavish adherence to the source material can make for a frustrating and, frankly, boring read. I’ve seen the film. I want … Continue reading

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CONSUMED by David Cronenberg (2014)

In David Cronenberg’s impossible to summarise debut novel, we follow the bizarre misadventures of a pair of journalist lovers on the trail of a French philosopher who murdered and ate his wife. Ha, you say! That was not impossible to … Continue reading

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CHILDMARE by Nick Sharman (1980)

Let’s talk about the unexplained. Or, rather, the over-explained. See for me, horror tends to work best when it takes place for no reason. It’s why Rob Zombie’s Halloween remake wasn’t as successful as the original, when Michael Myers was … Continue reading

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THE SCARLET GOSPELS by Clive Barker (2015)

I’d like this blog to be a positive place, where we can celebrate horror in it’s many forms. I take no pleasure in deriding a piece of work, and certainly do not enjoy knocking a master of the art. What … Continue reading

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SLUGS by Shaun Hutson (1982)

“Ron Bell got through one verse Mull of Kintyre, then threw up.” That’s the opening sentence of Slugs, and it certainly sets the grimy tone, not just for the novel, but for the rest of Hutson’s career. Often derided as a poor … Continue reading

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WALKERS by Graham Masterton (1989)

Graham Masterton is best known for his 1975 novel The Manitou, in which a tumour growing on a woman’s back turns out to be a mystical shaman or something. He also has a novel wherein, I believe, the DNA of the … Continue reading

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